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Welcome to Booklovers' Cafe!
Come to the next meeting of Booklovers’ Café:   Image result for stack of books               
The last Saturday of every month from 10:00  - 11:15 am,
or come at 9:30 for informal conversation and booktalking.
Check the library calender for the next date: Events
                                                                                                            
Come and enjoy tea, coffee, and muffins and share the wealth of your reading experiences with other readers. In the words of one participant, Booklovers’ Café is "a chance to talk with real people about real books!” Be prepared to chat informally about one or two books or authors you love—or just stop by to listen. Join us! All are welcome.

~We read books, talked books, argued over books, and became dearer and dearer to one another.~
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society
October 2017

Collared
By David Rosenfelt
The author is a dog fan - all of his books have a central figure who is a dog. It's a great series. The central character is a rich lawyer. He just keeps working because he thinks it's important. He has a wonderfully comic reaction to things - somewhat sarcastic. In this book it's very complicated. You think you'll figure it out but I doubt it. There is a guy in prison for kidnapping a baby- but he says he didn't do it so they try and figure it out. The baby was adopted- the mom runs a pharmaceutical company. There's also a drug lord involved. The central character has a crew of characters to help him out- a sullen lawyer who's a master at taking people out who are bothering you. His wife is a former police officer with lots of connections.

The Things They Carried
By Tim O'Brien
Watched the recent miniseries on Vietnam and thought I had never read this book and I should read it. It is wonderful and I want to read the rest of his writing. They quoted it at different points in the miniseries and it's very lyrical, but also very gritty. It's a group of stories about the unit he's in. At one point he goes through the story of one guy who died. He's driving around just thinking about this guy who died and how he feels complicit in his death. The next few stories are adding different layers and viewpoints of the same story. The message I got from the book was that this is some of what it was like to be there, but you can never really know what it was like without
having been there. Less about a concept and more about the emotions surrounding it.


The Bear and the Nightingale
By Katherine Arden
"Winter lasts most of the year at the edge of the Russian wilderness, and in the long nights, Vasilisa and her siblings love to gather by the fire to listen to their nurse’s fairy tales. Above all, Vasya loves the story of Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon. Wise Russians fear him, for he claims unwary souls, and they honor the spirits that protect their homes from evil. Then Vasya’s widowed father brings home a new wife from Moscow. Fiercely devout, Vasya’s stepmother forbids her family from honoring their household spirits, but Vasya fears what this may bring. And indeed, misfortune begins to stalk the village. But Vasya’s stepmother only grows harsher, determined to remake the village to her liking and to groom her rebellious stepdaughter for marriage or a convent. As the village’s defenses weaken and evil from the forest creeps nearer, Vasilisa must call upon dangerous gifts she has long concealed—to protect her family from a threat sprung to life from her nurse’s most frightening tales." Really wonderful book- highly recommend it.


The Book of Strange New Things
By Michel Faber
"It begins with Peter, a devoted man of faith, as he is called to the mission of a lifetime, one that takes him galaxies away from his wife, Bea. Peter becomes immersed in the mysteries of an astonishing new environment, overseen by an enigmatic corporation known only as USIC.   His work introduces him to a seemingly friendly native population struggling with a dangerous illness and hungry for Peter’s teachings—his Bible is their “book of strange new things.” But Peter is rattled when Bea’s letters from home become increasingly desperate: typhoons and earthquakes are devastating whole countries, and governments are crumbling.  Bea’s faith, once the guiding light of their lives, begins to falter. Suddenly, a separation measured by an otherworldly distance, and defined both by one newly discovered world and another in a state of collapse, is threatened by an ever-widening gulf that is much less quantifiable.  While Peter is reconciling the needs of his congregation with the desires of his strange employer, Bea is struggling for survival.  Their trials lay bare a profound meditation on faith, love tested beyond endurance, and our responsibility to those closest to us." A very unique and well written book- I would read anything written by this author.

Razor Girl
By Carl Hiaasen
Really good. Some of the most unconventional characters. Carries some of the same characters through some of his books. He's from Florida, and one of the characters is a former governor of Florida he ran on a platform of getting rid of the evil politicians and the corruption in politics, but when he got into office all the vested interests were appalled because he actually tried to get rid of the corruption. They eventually get him to resign and he goes rogue and lives out in the swamp on roadkill.

Stormy Weather
By Carl Hiaasen
"Two honeymooners wake up early, make love twice, and brace themselves for a spectacle they won't be watching from the sidelines. A seductive con artiste stumbles into a scam that promises more cool cash than the lottery. A shotgun-toting mobile home salesman is about to close a deal with disaster. A law school dropout will be chasing one Gaboon viper, a troop of storm-shocked monkeys, and a newfound love life, while tourists by the thousands bail from the Florida Keys. We're now entering the hurricane zone, where hell and hilarity rule. And in the hands of the masterful, merciless Carl Hiaasen, we're going to have some weather."

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